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Saint Leo University appoints Mark Gesner Vice President of Community Engagement

ST. LEO, FL – Jeffrey D. Senese, president of Saint Leo University, recently announced the appointment of Mark Gesner as vice president of community engagement and innovation. He will be a member of the university’s management team.

With a particular focus on the areas of community impact, social entrepreneurship and professional development, Gesner will be responsible for advancing community engagement at Saint Leo University, building community partnerships, creating new initiatives and to sit on various internal and external boards and committees.

Gesner comes to Saint Leo after serving as Executive Director of the Hub for Innovation and Community Engaged Learning at Cardinal Stritch University in Milwaukee, where he led the creation and implementation of programs focused on community development, entrepreneurship, leadership and experiential education. He was the co-founder and director of a social enterprise accelerator for nonprofit leaders, the campus responsible for a statewide television show, Project Pitch It, featuring entrepreneurs from Wisconsin; and host of the Mission Driven Leaders Lecture Series.

Prior to this role, Gesner was Associate Vice President Academic Affairs and Faculty Chair of Community Engaged Learning and Leadership at Cardinal Stritch’s College of Business and Management. He has also held leadership positions at the University of Wisconsin – Parkside and Hostelling International – USA, an organization dedicated to educational travel and intercultural exchange.

“Mark is a proven leader whose commitment to building community relationships and business partnerships will not only improve Saint Leo University, but also benefit the Tampa area and wherever Saint Leo teaches,” said Senese. “His leadership skills in experiential education and business innovation will be of great value as we boldly and confidently move towards an even more successful future at Saint Leo University.”

Gesner has received several awards for his work, including the Milwaukee BizTimes Media Nonprofit Excellence Award for Social Enterprise and the Campus Compact Civic Engagement Practitioners Award. He recently co-authored his first book, Your Life is Your Message: Discovering the Core of Transformational Leadership (SAGE Publishing). Gesner has taught and designed courses and seminars on intercultural competence, leadership, entrepreneurship and organizational development.

He holds a bachelor’s degree in communication and journalism from the State University of New York at Albany, a master’s degree in education from Harvard University, and a doctorate in leadership for the advancement of learning. and service in higher education at Cardinal Stritch University.

“I look forward to building relationships and collaborating with the many businesses and organizations in the Tampa area and beyond,” said Gesner. “I hope to explore emerging opportunities and discover powerful ways for Saint Leo University to be a catalyst and partner to generate positive social and economic impact.”

Companies looking to partner with Saint Leo University can contact Gesner at mark.gesner@saintleo.edu.


This press release was produced by Saint Leo University. The opinions expressed here are those of the author.


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Old fashioned community engagement

A new viral money-making game industry project called HIFI Society has set its sights on industry domination through game proven in building blockchains and crypto communities.

In this article, we take a look at how they plan to do it with a toolkit involving games, cryptocurrencies, and NFTs.

What is HIFI?

HIFI is an emerging Play-To-Earn crypto gaming project that seeks to be a leader in the industry. This is the first major project of the HIFI Society ecosystem.

HIFI wants to build paths for players as well as for artists by helping them build their professional careers on the blockchain. Simultaneously, their platform is designed to attract game studios and game developers to list their old games and re-activate revenue using HIFI’s reward engine. Its game economy platform includes more than thirty retro video games, as well as rewarding experiences and services. And it’s designed to get better with age. Equipped with an exclusive game analytics backend to enable HIFI to constantly improve their user experience based on player activity.

Users and community building first

In a cryptocurrency industry riddled with pump and dump schemes as well as well-intentioned projects too focused on short-term price action, the individual user is often left behind.

The team behind HIFI has chosen a different direction. Long-term price appreciation depends on use cases and a strong community. They therefore put the community and the users first. The value of a platform and its cryptocurrency tokens is only of value to its users.

HIFI seeks to target, engage and retain different elements of the community according to their needs:

  • Inventors: want a return on investment
  • Traders: want volatility
  • Players: want to play
  • Competitive players: want to compete
  • Viewers: want to be entertained

Already in beta with over 1,000 users, as well as a community of over 5,000 users on Twitter, HIFI seeks to combine the successful traditional elements of a fun user experience with blockchain innovations. Here’s a look at what’s on-board.

Elements of the HIFI ecosystem

The first element HIFI draws on is the gamer nostalgia that users have for retro games. They have acquired dozens of games from the 80s, 90s and 2000s and one of them is ideally designed for keyboard gaming, others for joystick gaming. Their aim was to provide something for a wide range of players.

Now enter the competitive game. Esport has been a growing trend for decades, with professional teams organized at the professional athlete level. But for the most part, eSports has been a closed group of very professional people. What about something for the everyday user who just wants to have fun or in between?

HIFI has integrated blockchain into the platform to make the user experience appealing to all levels of gamers. The $ HIFI token was built on the Binance Smart Chain to optimize the user experience with the lowest fees. The token comes into play in several ways:

  • All users will need to wager (not spend) tokens to participate in the platform.
  • Users can earn tokens by participating in the platform.
  • More dedicated users can participate in gaming competitions and earn even more tokens.

Following the launch of the platform, one of the next steps in the roadmap will include the implementation of staking rewards. More serious competitors can increase their earnings in this way.

Additionally, $ HIFI will engage in quarterly token burning, buying back tokens and destroying them to reduce supply, create upward pressure on prices, and entice all community participants.

Look ahead

With the launch of the HIFI company’s gaming platform in the following month, they have already focused on building other elements of their ecosystem, which will link with HIFI Gaming.

The next phase will include launching NFT in popular third-party markets, showcasing artists, musicians and player influencers with co-branded NFTs, and activating the NFT utility in their own NFT marketplace, which will be aimed at artists as well as players using the system. There is also a plan to integrate yield farming. This is one of the reasons the team chose to create the $ HIFI token on the Binance Smart Chain.

HIFI’s target is a large, dynamic and growing community, with a range of different participants who are each rewarded for their participation, and a platform that responds to their demands.


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City seeks applicants for 2022 social and community development grant – Kamloops News

The city seeks to provide grants

The City of Kamloops is seeking to provide funding for projects that will meet community needs such as affordable housing, child care, food security or homeless support.

According to a statement from the city, funding will be made available through the 2022 Social and Community Development Grant for projects run by nonprofit organizations and corporations.

“Projects will be evaluated and awarded based on the quality of the bid and the benefit to the community,” the city said.

Interested organizations can apply for up to $ 30,000, and the grant can be used to cover operational costs, special projects, or seed money for a social enterprise initiative.

The city said applicants must demonstrate that their project will meet one of the priorities identified in the Kamloops Social Plan, including alternative transportation, food security, mental health services or tackling drug-related crime and addiction issues.

Applicants will need to show that their project will enhance the well-being of the community, address community issues and concerns, and improve the ability to respond to specific social needs.

The 2022 Social and Community Development Grant application deadline is November 15 at 8 a.m.

The city said applicants will find out if they have been approved for funding in December.

Interested organizations can get more information and apply through the City of Kamloops website.


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North Heights Community Development Initiative in Limbo

On Tuesday, two scheduled votes on the North Heights rezoning were postponed indefinitely by a 3-2 majority on a motion by board member Freda Powell. She felt that the community disagreed with the proposal.

The board was so divided on the issue that board member Howard Smith brought forward yet another motion to overturn the previous motion to indefinitely suspend voting on North Heights. The motion failed by a 3-2 vote, with board members Eddy Sauer and Cole Stanley changing their votes to postpone the rezoning vote.

Following:Amarillo city council divided over the rezoning of the North Heights area

“In my mind, it makes sense to pause, go back and have another conversation about this,” said Mayor Ginger Nelson. She cited all the work that had been done so far on the rezoning.

“We still have to move the project forward but we realize we have as many citizens against this measure as we do for it,” said Powell.

Board member Stanley said he was always ready to come back to the table and negotiate. He proposed that the incentives and empowerment zones would better serve the purpose rather than the current proposal. He felt that working with businesses to change their own zoning would be a more effective solution.

“I’m against rezoning the personal property of anyone against their will… I’m not going to change my position,” Stanley said.

Previously, the first phase of the North Heights redistribution plan passed by a narrow 3-2 majority and was subject to a second reading and a vote, which would have finalized the proposal. Ahead of the board meeting, a petition was filed, signed by opposing business owners to force a qualified majority vote (4-1) for the proposal to pass. With the petition in consideration, a 3-2 vote would not pass the measure.

During public comments at the council meeting, Joe Shane, a representative for George Chapman, who is a major landowner who is part of the group that filed a petition against the city’s rezoning initiative, explained that his group owned more than 20% of the land ownership as required to force an absolute majority vote.

Amarillo resident Alan Abraham has spoken out in favor of redeveloping the community to revitalize the economy of North Heights. He said the area has been neglected in the past and the needs of the community outweigh the potential future benefits of a few landowners.

“You are North Heights’ only recourse to municipal government, and right now North Heights needs you to defend the inferior profit motives of a few landowners. City zoning laws are a key component of economic development in any neighborhood. Nothing changes until the zoning laws are compatible with the desired future growth, ”Abraham said.

Hughes Street, located in Historic North Heights, is one of the areas proposed for rezoning by Amarillo City Council on October 16, 2021.

What is at issue in this case is that the rezoning is usually changed by the owners of the properties, rather than a complete rezoning of an entire area. There was also a setback that not all community members were included in creating a solution for the proposal.

Fransetta Mitchell Crow, a resident of the North Heights community and former candidate for Amarillo city council, was disappointed by the indefinite postponement of the vote.

“I feel like this was just another setback for the North Heights community because when you say ‘postponed indefinitely’ it leaves you with no direction to go,” Crow said. “We need positive progress on this issue which affects all members of the North Heights community.”

Crow said the zoning and North Heights issues had been under discussion since 2013 and today, eight years later, no solution has yet been proposed. She also said that the city did not have a great deal of involvement from all residents and business owners in the community.

Example of an industrial building stuck right next to residential accommodation in North Heights on October 16, 2021.

“Everyone should have a say in this issue in the community, and the solution should benefit all aspects of the community,” Crow said. “We need to bring unity back to the community.”

Timothy Gassaway, head of the Amarillo Region Black Chamber of Commerce, said the postponement was just another example of a failure to properly address this issue.

“The city didn’t have the main stakeholders involved in the process from the start,” Gassaway said. “We were ready to compromise, but we were forced to go out and sign petitions to end this forced rezoning. Today’s vote did not mean that we were unwilling to address pressing zoning issues and issues. “

Gassaway explained that the proposed zoning changes ignore current businesses and residences already in place. The city has licensed several mobile homes in the North Heights District over the years, as well as no standard zoning configuration that allows for multiple uses without a development structure. He believes the plan ignores what is already in place and is not a practical way to fix the neighborhood.

“The North Heights Advisory Association cannot speak for the neighborhood; they don’t have depth in the community, ”Gassaway said.

North Heights Advisory Association president Melodie Graves said the rezoning failure was disheartening for a long neglected community in need of structured revitalization due to lack of infrastructure.

“I want people to know that our community is not divided. Some people see this problem differently, but people as a whole want better for this community, “Graves said.” There are good things going on in this community, but if we don’t make this area more appealing to developers, it continue to drop.

“We approached it from a community perspective to make it better; you can see the disparities on this side of town compared to other areas with the patchwork zoning that has been allowed.”

Graves said some entities want to make this personal, but what’s best for North Heights is the priority. She noted that North Heights needs to have more community services so residents don’t have to travel this far to use them.

While all parties insist that there is no division, this issue appears to have no solution for a region in dire need of revitalization.


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SPD community service worker on the cusp of growing up, but the program still finds its feet

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Kevin Hendrix, SPD Community Service Officer, and Sworn Officer Hosea Crumpton; image via SPD Facebook.

By Paul Kiefer

The relaunch of the Seattle Police Department’s Community Service Officer (CSO) unit in late 2019 was quickly overshadowed by a global pandemic. For the next two years, the unarmed civilian team remained mostly under the radar, handling non-emergency calls, connecting runaway children and victims of domestic violence with service providers, and arranging meetings during neighborhood events.

Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan’s 2022 budget proposal would add six new officers to the CSO program, making it the only police department program to gain new full-time positions next year. Durkan’s plan would bring the total funded posts to 24; the team is still waiting to fill 10 existing positions that have been vacant since the start of the summer, so bringing the program to full capacity would mean hiring an additional 18 people.

In some ways, the city council’s vocal support for scaling up alternatives to traditional (armed) police puts the CSO program in an advantageous position: instead of bulletproof vests and a gun belt. , CSOs wear light blue polo shirts and walkie-talkies. But the unit is still part of the SPD, and despite pressure from some activists to move the program to a civilian department, the CSOs themselves have made it clear that they want to stay put. At the same time, some of the unit’s responsibilities appear increasingly redundant in a growing ecosystem of civilian-led public security services.

For a week at the end of September, CSOs participated in six community gatherings with the aim of “building positive relationships” with community members; According to Chris Inaba, one of the unit’s two civilian supervisors, the purpose of these appearances is both to introduce community members to the CSO agenda and to act as friendly ambassadors for the SPD.

For the police service, the CSO program serves as both an internal patrol support team and a community relations tool: a friendly and approachable face for a service desperately trying to regain public trust. As Seattle directs its energy towards civilizing public safety, the CSO program is the department’s most salable asset and could, according to program officials, play a key role in reconnecting the city to the SPD.

For a week at the end of September, CSOs participated in six community gatherings with the aim of “building positive relationships” with community members; According to Chris Inaba, one of the unit’s two civilian supervisors, the purpose of these appearances is both to introduce community members to the CSO agenda and to act as friendly ambassadors for the SPD.

Inaba was one of the first people the department hired when the city finally revived the CSO program in 2019. Prior to joining SPD, he spent three years working for the Downtown Seattle Association as a security supervisor. and outreach case manager.

While the current CSO program is still finding its feet, the concept is not new to Seattle. The department initially started the program in the early 1970s with the aim of defusing tensions between the SPD and black residents of the Central District – tensions sparked by allegations of racist police and excessive force by officers in the department – and to create a recruitment channel for Black police officers. For 33 years, the unit has taken care of everything from landlord-tenant disputes to reconnecting homeless youth with their families. But after a series of budget cuts under then-mayor Greg Nickels, the SPD dissolved the original CSO agenda in 2004.

For a week in September, SPD patrol staff made ten calls to CSOs. In one case, officers found shelter for a homeless family; in another, an officer paid an Uber to take a victim of domestic violence to a friend’s house after connecting her with a lawyer.

When the SPD and then-city council member Mike O’Brien announced their intention to relaunch the program in 2017, the SPD was embroiled in allegations of racist police and excessive force – and, as a result, five years after the start of a monitoring agreement with the US Department of Justice known as the Consent Order. Even before the department assembled a new CSO team, some community activists had already raised the possibility of pulling the program out of the SPD. But the department’s leadership stood firm, arguing that CSOs should act as a complement to the patrol, not as an autonomous team of social workers providing enveloping care.

With the ranks of the SPD stretched after more than a year of high attrition, CSOs have frequently fulfilled this additional role. Over a week at the end of September, SPD patrol staff sent calls to CSOs ten times. In one case, officers found shelter for a homeless family; in another, an officer paid an Uber to take a victim of domestic violence to a friend’s house after connecting her with a lawyer.

Right now, said Inaba, CSOs are among the only stakeholders who have the time to manage these tasks. “What we have is time, so we can help free a sworn officer to take care of other things while we help someone figure out where to find what they need,” did he declare. Over the past year, SPD patrol officers have called on CSOs for help on more than 500 emergency calls; Inaba is hoping that the city’s 911 dispatch can eventually send CSOs directly to emergency calls, which he says would add to their usefulness.

CSOs are not the only stakeholders to fill this niche. The Seattle Fire Department is expanding its Health One program, which was also launched in 2019 to respond to people with substance abuse or mental health crises, and in July Durkan announced plans for a third response team. civilian – tentatively called “marshalling teams” – which will also respond to low-severity emergency calls.

Lt. Kevin Nelson, the sworn SPD officer who oversees the CSO program, noted that the unit’s efforts to conduct outreach to youth and ultimately run diversion programs have been less successful. Seattle public school administrators and community center staff have rejected requests from CSOs to spend time with students after school hours, he said.

As with alternative crisis response teams, CSOs are far from the only program interested in youth diversion programs; some, like Choose 180, are well established and increasingly integrated into the city’s juvenile justice system. But Inaba believes there is still a niche for CSOs. “Our job is to let young people know that they can trust the ministry,” he said. “The most important thing is to make them feel comfortable reporting things to the police, so I think public safety would be beneficial if they found out that the department is there to protect them.” This task, he said, can only be accomplished by the SPD itself – and CSOs are the department’s best bet for the job.

Currently, the CSO unit itself is too stretched to do anything that Inaba, Nelson and the department heads would have it do. Early last summer, the unit lost about two-thirds of its staff – one became a police officer and another joined the Tacoma city attorney’s office.

From SPD’s perspective, the CSO unit needs new blood to reach its full potential. But expanding the unit by a third will cost money – $ 1.3 million – which will put it in competition with other civilian emergency response programs like Health One and with the non-profit youth diversion that depends on city grants. City Council Public Safety Chairperson Lisa Herbold expressed support for the new CSO positions last week; However, Durkan’s proposal could still come under scrutiny as other board members question whether CSOs should indeed remain part of the SPD.


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SPD community service worker on the cusp of growing up, but the program still finds its feet

0
Kevin Hendrix, SPD Community Service Officer, and Sworn Officer Hosea Crumpton; image via SPD Facebook.

By Paul Kiefer

The relaunch of the Seattle Police Department’s Community Service Officer (CSO) unit in late 2019 was quickly overshadowed by a global pandemic. For the next two years, the unarmed civilian team remained mostly under the radar, handling non-emergency calls, connecting runaway children and victims of domestic violence with service providers, and arranging meetings during neighborhood events.

Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan’s 2022 budget proposal would add six new officers to the CSO program, making it the only police department program to gain new full-time positions next year. Durkan’s plan would bring the total funded posts to 24; the team is still waiting to fill 10 existing positions that have been vacant since the start of the summer, so bringing the program to full capacity would mean hiring an additional 18 people.

In some ways, the city council’s vocal support for scaling up alternatives to traditional (armed) police puts the CSO program in an advantageous position: instead of bulletproof vests and a gun belt. , CSOs wear light blue polo shirts and walkie-talkies. But the unit is still part of the SPD, and despite pressure from some activists to move the program to a civilian department, the CSOs themselves have made it clear that they want to stay put. At the same time, some of the unit’s responsibilities appear increasingly redundant in a growing ecosystem of civilian-led public security services.

For a week at the end of September, CSOs participated in six community gatherings with the aim of “building positive relationships” with community members; According to Chris Inaba, one of the unit’s two civilian supervisors, the purpose of these appearances is both to introduce community members to the CSO agenda and to act as friendly ambassadors for the SPD.

For the police service, the CSO program serves as both an internal patrol support team and a community relations tool: a friendly and approachable face for a service desperately trying to regain public trust. As Seattle directs its energy towards civilizing public safety, the CSO program is the department’s most salable asset and could, according to program officials, play a key role in reconnecting the city to the SPD.

For a week at the end of September, CSOs participated in six community gatherings with the aim of “building positive relationships” with community members; According to Chris Inaba, one of the unit’s two civilian supervisors, the purpose of these appearances is both to introduce community members to the CSO agenda and to act as friendly ambassadors for the SPD.

Inaba was one of the first people the department hired when the city finally revived the CSO program in 2019. Prior to joining SPD, he spent three years working for the Downtown Seattle Association as a security supervisor. and outreach case manager.

While the current CSO program is still finding its feet, the concept is not new to Seattle. The department initially started the program in the early 1970s with the aim of defusing tensions between the SPD and black residents of the Central District – tensions sparked by allegations of racist police and excessive force by officers in the department – and to create a recruitment channel for Black police officers. For 33 years, the unit has taken care of everything from landlord-tenant disputes to reconnecting homeless youth with their families. But after a series of budget cuts under then-mayor Greg Nickels, the SPD dissolved the original CSO agenda in 2004.

For a week in September, SPD patrol staff made ten calls to CSOs. In one case, officers found shelter for a homeless family; in another, an officer paid an Uber to take a victim of domestic violence to a friend’s house after connecting her with a lawyer.

When the SPD and then-city council member Mike O’Brien announced their intention to relaunch the program in 2017, the SPD was embroiled in allegations of racist police and excessive force – and, as a result, five years after the start of a monitoring agreement with the US Department of Justice known as the Consent Order. Even before the department assembled a new CSO team, some community activists had already raised the possibility of pulling the program out of the SPD. But the department’s leadership stood firm, arguing that CSOs should act as a complement to the patrol, not as an autonomous team of social workers providing enveloping care.

With the ranks of the SPD stretched after more than a year of high attrition, CSOs have frequently fulfilled this additional role. Over a week at the end of September, SPD patrol staff sent calls to CSOs ten times. In one case, officers found shelter for a homeless family; in another, an officer paid an Uber to take a victim of domestic violence to a friend’s house after connecting her with a lawyer.

Right now, said Inaba, CSOs are among the only stakeholders who have the time to manage these tasks. “What we have is time, so we can help free a sworn officer to take care of other things while we help someone figure out where to find what they need,” did he declare. Over the past year, SPD patrol officers have called on CSOs for help on more than 500 emergency calls; Inaba is hoping that the city’s 911 dispatch can eventually send CSOs directly to emergency calls, which he says would add to their usefulness.

CSOs are not the only stakeholders to fill this niche. The Seattle Fire Department is expanding its Health One program, which was also launched in 2019 to respond to people with substance abuse or mental health crises, and in July Durkan announced plans for a third response team. civilian – tentatively called “marshalling teams” – which will also respond to low-severity emergency calls.

Lt. Kevin Nelson, the sworn SPD officer who oversees the CSO program, noted that the unit’s efforts to conduct outreach to youth and ultimately run diversion programs have been less successful. Seattle public school administrators and community center staff have rejected requests from CSOs to spend time with students after school hours, he said.

As with alternative crisis response teams, CSOs are far from the only program interested in youth diversion programs; some, like Choose 180, are well established and increasingly integrated into the city’s juvenile justice system. But Inaba believes there is still a niche for CSOs. “Our job is to let young people know that they can trust the ministry,” he said. “The most important thing is to make them feel comfortable reporting things to the police, so I think public safety would be beneficial if they found out that the department is there to protect them.” This task, he said, can only be accomplished by the SPD itself – and CSOs are the department’s best bet for the job.

Currently, the CSO unit itself is too stretched to do anything that Inaba, Nelson and the department heads would have it do. Early last summer, the unit lost about two-thirds of its staff – one became a police officer and another joined the Tacoma city attorney’s office.

From SPD’s perspective, the CSO unit needs new blood to reach its full potential. But expanding the unit by a third will cost money – $ 1.3 million – which will put it in competition with other civilian emergency response programs like Health One and with the non-profit youth diversion that depends on city grants. City Council Public Safety Chairperson Lisa Herbold expressed support for the new CSO positions last week; However, Durkan’s proposal could still come under scrutiny as other board members question whether CSOs should indeed remain part of the SPD.


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Kimberley Community Development Society to step down – Kimberley Daily Bulletin

A Kimberley company that was responsible for many of the city’s most visible assets is on the way out.

Kimberley Community Development Society (KCDS) President Karen Cetinski announced in a press release that after 37 years of community service, the business model has run its course.

In its heyday, KCDS was involved in the management and development of Kimberley Vacations, Kimberley Riverside Campground, Sports Training and Conference Center, Bootleg Gap Golf Course, Cominco Gardens and the Ice Building. Cream Hut in downtown.

Most of these assets have now been sold, only Cominco Gardens and the Ice Cream Hut building in the city center remain.

“With no future projects on the horizon with the City, we really don’t really have a mandate to continue,” Cetinski said.

“KCDS was ahead of its time in the 1980s, but now is the time to slow down as the City’s economic development model has changed,” said Mayor Don McCormick. “I want to thank all of the board members and staff who have done such a good job over the years. “

The KCDS was formed in 1984 with the participation of the city’s economic development officer, Larry Haber, who envisioned a coordinated approach between the city government and a non-profit corporation that could seek grants from a larger wide range of sources. Once the projects were completed, the KCDS would manage the assets or help other community groups to do so.

With an experienced administrative and financial department, KCDS has also been able to set up bookkeeping services for other community organizations, many of which operate in city-owned buildings such as the Health Center, the Library Kimberley Public and Center 64.

“One of our most important considerations has been to come up with strategies to continue to support community groups that currently rely on the services of the KCDS administrative department,” said former president Craig Hillman. “We also had to help with the transition of the management of some of the big assets such as the conference center, the campground and Bootleg.

“It’s not easy to count all the assets, process agreements with suppliers, complete the books of accounts and audits and prepare to hand over the keys to new groups. The last two and biggest assets we had to transition during the first waves of the pandemic, which was a big challenge. “

The key question now is what will happen with the largest remaining asset, Cominco Gardens. Cetinski says this will be the last season that the KCDS will manage and operate the garden and that they have passed on recommendations to city council that will provide good options for the operation and staffing of the gardens next year and beyond. of the.

“It’s the city’s trump card that ultimately it is their decision on how to proceed,” she said.

READ: What’s next for KCDS?

READ: Kimberley Community Development Society honors Sykes


carolyn.grant@kimberleybulletin.com
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Stanton Receives $ 445,000 Community Development Block Grant | New

(Stanton) – The Town of Stanton has received a substantial financial boost for its downtown revitalization project.

The Iowa Economic Development Authority awarded its latest round of block grants for community development, with Stanton being one of the recipients. In a press release, the city said it had received just over $ 445,000 for its downtown revitalization project through the Development Authority. Stanton’s director of community development, Jenna Ramsey, said the project includes eight buildings in downtown Stanton, all of which will undergo unique renovations.

“Every building is different, some are windows, some are facade canopies, paint, really anything that needs to be improved on the front facade,” Ramsey said. “We did a historic downtown study to look at what buildings looked like in the past, and that was one of the requirements of this block community development grant.”

Buildings include Underdog Design and Drawing, Old Gun Store at 318 Broad Avenue, Old Toy Store at 324 Broad Avenue, Old Stanton Senior Center at 326 Broad Avenue, Great Western Bank, Pershin Laundromat and Pershin Service.

Including local contributions and owners’ counterparts, the overall project total amounts to just over $ 762,000. Ramsey says the grant has been in the works for several months.

“We actually started last spring and we hired Curtis Architecture (and Design) in Oskaloosa, and they took over the design of the architecture, and then we applied in August and we got it. discovered recently, ”Ramsey said.

Ramsey says other grant donors include the Iowa West Foundation, the Ripple Effect Program, the Rural Innovation Grant, the Power of Connection, and the Montgomery County Foundation.

Ramsey also says this is just the last update downtown Stanton has received.

“A few years ago the town of Stanton received a catalyst grant and the Mason Building was remodeled, and since then other buildings have been remodeled by Farmers Mutual Telephone Company,” Ramsey said. “It just continues Stanton’s enthusiasm, enthusiasm and energy, if you will, to keep our downtown core moving forward and renovating.”

Ramsey says the hope is to sign a contractor over the winter months with work on the project starting in the spring of 2022.

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Purcellville police officer honored for community service

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Sergeant Robert Wagner was honored by the Nam Knights of America Motorcycle Club, Old Dominion Chapter, for his outstanding record of community service to the Town of Purcellville and the Purcellville Police Department. The award was presented to Sergeant Wagner at their annual fundraising event in Leesburg, Va., To benefit veterans and law enforcement officers and their families.

Sergeant Wagner was chosen to be recognized by the Nam Knights of America for being the embodiment of a community-engaged police officer. Police departments in a small town like Purcellville offer officers the opportunity to get to know those who live and / or work in the town on a more personal level. Sergeant Wagner is always happy to provide any service possible, whether it’s just giving instructions, changing a flat tire, or helping someone who has accidentally locked their keys in the car. Besides helping with simple tasks, Sergeant Wagner can also engage with the community on a larger scale. Whether it’s volunteering time to participate in the local high school football practices, helping the homeless get a hot meal, warm clothes and finding a safe place to stay, or personally supervising elderly residents after their surgery, Sergeant Wagner makes an effort to get to know people of all ages in Purcellville and provide support in any way.

“Sergeant Wagner always goes above and beyond for someone in need,” said Chief Cynthia McAlister. “Last year, he led the construction of a new patio and ramp for an elderly resident, and personally completed the follow-up maintenance of the structure for her this summer, including washing. under pressure and dyeing. While these aren’t typical police officer’s duties, Sergeant Wagner makes a point of making sure those in town who need help get it. Sergeant Wagner’s heart and mind are exemplified in his expression of kindness and empathy towards the people he serves, and are refreshing not only in his conversations, but most importantly in his actions. Its ability to continually, day after day, year after year, foster positive and lasting relationships is invaluable, especially in the current climate where the emphasis is on mistrust of law enforcement, ”said said Chief McAlister.


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Funding secured for a new domestic violence community engagement worker

The local branch of women’s support has secured funding for a new part-time position as part of a new program bringing together Shetland, Orkney and the Western Isles to tackle domestic violence.

Around £ 115,000 will go to the new project through the Scottish Government’s Delivering Equally Safe island groups.

Locally, this means that a coordinator will be recruited for the Shetland Domestic Abuse Partnership, which brings together local agencies.

Laura Stronach, Director of Shetland Women’s Aid.

Shetland Women’s Aid service manager Laura Stronach said the post would be responsible for community engagement and outreach.

Ensuring that training is deployed across Shetlands is also on the agenda.

Similar roles will be recruited for Orkney and the Western Isles.

“It will be up to each person on each island to work together and share ideas so that what is done in one group of islands can be changed for the next,” said Stronach.

“It’s a real partnership, networking – everyone shares.

Meanwhile, the government’s Equally Safe Action Fund, which is designed to prevent and end violence against women and girls will also provide core funding to Shetland Women’s Aid and Shetland Rape Crisis over the next two years.

Local Women’s Aid will receive almost £ 383,000 over the next two years.

Stronach said there were 95 cases of adults active at the charity and 78 on the waiting list. For children, these numbers are 30 and 26.

The organization employs 12 people and two more are in preparation.

Meanwhile, Shetland Rape Crisis will receive almost £ 346,000 over the next two years.

Services manager Lisa Ward said it would go to the association’s running costs and staff salaries.

“This will allow us to continue to provide free, inclusive and confidential support, advice, advocacy and information to all non-violent people, of any gender (13 years and older), in Shetlands affected by all forms of sexual violence. at any time of their life. life, as well as proactive work to prevent gender-based violence in our community.

“We are very grateful to the Scottish Government’s Delivering Equally Safe team for recognizing the need for core funding our service, for which the demand continues to grow year on year, and for recognizing that survivors of sexual violence Shetland people deserve quick access to this specialist. support to help them find their own path after trauma.

A total of 112 organizations in Scotland have received funding under this program.

Equality Minister Christina McKelvie said: “Violence against women and girls is appalling and unacceptable, which is why we fund organizations that are tackling the problem head on, including women and girls. frontline services that support survivors and get to the root of abusive behavior.

“These organizations offer new and innovative ways to assist recovery, encourage education and increase awareness of prevention.”


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